Writing About Things That Have Not Happened

By on 7-25-2015 in Writing

When you are a writer, you tend to think about a lot of possible scenarios. You have to be able to envision with clarity, how something would happen, so that when you write it, you can write it in a way that your readers could imagine the same way. This means, writers have to write about things that have not actually happened in their lives, but they have to write it in such a way that makes it very realistic, even if its fictional.

Angela Dennis writes about fictional scenarios and fictional characters, not just in the sense that the story is made up, but also in the sense that the nature of the characters are made up. Wolves? Vampires? Other mythical creatures? They’re not exactly in existence, right? I mean, that is why they are called mythical, in the first place? (Now I’m starting to worry if they really are NON-EXISTENT).

So, when a writer writes about unrealistic things, how do they go about it? I mean, they say you can never really know about anything unless you experience it. And I would like to believe that Angela Dennis has never really encountered any vampires, right? So how does she do it?

Well, I could never really ask her in person, because I might just stutter and faint, given the fandom that I have for her. So, I went out and asked other writers that I know. Amateur writers that are inspired to write and try their best to be acknowledged by the craft that they love.

One writer friend told me that the key to it all is research. Reading is a form of experience, and when you read something, you get to imagine it. It is through reading other information about a certain mythical creature or event that some writers get their inspiration from. They may have not experienced the actual scene, but because they read on it, they have the idea on how it goes, and so from there, they write their own.

My friend also shared with me that the first time she wrote a funeral scene, she did not know how to go about it. First, it was a scary scene to imagine, and she felt scared because she was talking about the death of a person. While it may not be an actual person in her life, the idea of death and funeral made her scared because she was made to embrace the possibility of it happening to her or her family.

She was able to finish the book after a few days of choking up on that specific scene. What made her relax and move on from the scary feeling she felt? She went ahead and searched for funeral insurance info that she can use for the write-up, as well as avail for her and her family. She had her parents think about the information she got and presented them, and the whole family decided to get insured.

This did not stop the idea of the possibility of death, but at least it got her whole family securing their futures. The whole point of it all, is to demonstrate how sometimes, even the stories get to the authors too, and it also makes them deal with physical and emotional stress. However, these instances makes them more inspired to write, making their books very engaging to readers as well.